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Winter CSA: Box 5

4

February 1, 2012 by Sara Kreidler

Sorry for the lack of posts as of late.  Between work and wedding planning, things have been pretty crazy around these parts.  But today another CSA box arrived, and with that a reminder to stop spending so much time reading wedding blogs and to spend some time on here.

This week’s box includes:

  • carrots
  • potatoes
  • 1 yellow onion
  • 1 daikon radish
  • 1 large beet
  • 1 pint sauerkraut
  • 1 red cabbage
  • goldrush apples
  • local chevre with herbs
  • mesclun greens
  • crimini mushrooms

And now for some close ups of the goods:

carrots.

potatoes.

yellow onion.

beet.

daikon radish.

red cabbage.

local chevre with herbs. the other cheese are also local but were add ons (not actually part of the subscription box).

crimini mushrooms.

mesclun greens.

sauerkraut.

I am totally overrun with red cabbage at the moment — there are now three of them living in my fridge.  Don’t get me wrong, I like red cabbage, but I have more than I can eat.  If you would like to adopt a red cabbage and you live in the Pittsburgh area, leave me a message and it’s yours.

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4 thoughts on “Winter CSA: Box 5

  1. I found your blog last week when I was trying to decide wether to sign up for the CSA or not. You convinced me! Thanks for these posts. I love in Beaver County and cant wait until June for my CSA delivery to start.
    Do you do any pressure canning (and blog about it)? I havent had time to completely go through your blog just yet. I got a pressure canner for Christmas and hope to make good use of it this fall.
    Julia

    • Sara says:

      Hi Julia! Glad you’re enjoying the blog and that you decided to join the CSA. We do own a pressure canner and have used it to put up chicken, beef and vegetable stock, but nothing else so far, and I’ve not blogged about it. The pressure canner is great but it’s a good bit more work that the boiling water bath (BWB) canner, and with the exception of stock, all of the things we preserve are BWB canner safe (that is, high acid content). Marisa at the blog Food in Jars has a few posts on pressure canning (http://www.foodinjars.com/recipe-index/, scroll about half way down to see the recipes for pressure canning, mostly soups and stock though). NCHFP also has info and recipes for pressure canning (http://nchfp.uga.edu/publications/uga/using_press_canners.html)

      As far as canning veggies from the CSA goes, you may want to consider recipes for BWB canners instead because pressure canners tend to leave you with very soggy veggies. You can do tomatoes (properly acidifed), all manner of pickled veggies (cucumbers, beans, peppers and beets to name just a few), jams, jellies and fruits in the BWB canner without the food turning to mush. All of the recipes on this blog are for BWB canning, and are based upon safe, tested recipes from reliable canning sources (I only tweak things like spices, which won’t change the ph levels of the food being canned, which is important for making sure your canned goods are safe to eat). A list of all of my canning recipes can be found under the “canning inventory” tab at the top of my main page (here’s the direct link as well: http://mavieenfood.com/canning/).

      Lastly, if you don’t already own it, I highly recommend picking up a copy of the Ball Blue Book. You can buy it on amazon, and I’ve seen it in Ace Hardware stores as well. It has both BWB and pressure canning recipes.

      I hope that helps! Enjoy the CSA and don’t hesitate to drop me a comment or email if you have other questions! — Sara

  2. Geraldine says:

    Hi Sara,
    Every time I read your blog, I swoon over your CSA shares. What a variety for this time of year! I would love to have apples right now. We don’t do a CSA share but were buying local apples from the cooperative market until they ran out. Somehow I never tire of local apples. Enjoy one for me!
    ~geraldine

    • Sara says:

      Thanks Geraldine! We are very lucky with our CSA, and their apples are one of my favorites, called goldrush. If you stumble across goldrush apples at a market sometime, definitely pick some up, they’re really amazing. I will be happy to enjoy one for you in the meantime!

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